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GS 1012 GUN BLUING
This course is a study of the chemical processes and procedures used to produce a black oxide finish on firearms utilizing the hot caustic immersion and rust bluing processes. Metal preparation bluing room design, equipment, chemicals, and safety factors will be covered. Polishing techniques and metal preparation utilizing primarily hand techniques will be emphasized. Students will develop skills by applying these processes to test pieces, tools, and project firearms. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Two semester hours.
 
GS 1113 GUNSMITHING THEORY I
Pre-requisite: None.
This course will give the student an explanation of firearms design, function nomenclature, assembly & disassembly and minor repair. Students will use factory updates in this course. The course will cover shotguns (Over/under, Pump, Internal Gas Systems, External Gas Systems, Short & Long, and Recoil & Blowback Systems). Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 1512 BLUEPRINT READING
Pre-requisite: None.
This course is designed to provide the technical student with the necessary skills to visualize and interpret industrial drawings and prints encountered in the machine trades. This course includes an introduction to drawing and print types, principles of orthographic projection, the alphabet and precedence of line types, interpretation of single and multi-view drawing, interpretation of title blocks, various methods of dimensioning and tolerance, types of view sectioning, special notation, and auxiliary views will be discussed. The student will also learn the basics of Isometric sketching used to produce simple technical sketches. An emphasis will be placed on the use of technical illustrations and prints to develop these basic skills and understanding. The use of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) may be added as laboratory conditions permit. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours per week; Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 1122 GUNSMITHING THEORY II
Pre-requisite: GS 1113.
This course will cover firearms design, function nomenclature, assembly and disassembly of guns, and minor gun repair. Factory updates for each gun will also be covered. The course will cover semi-automatic pistols, double-action revolvers, single-action revolvers, gas operated rifles, and lever action rifles. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 1313 MACHINE TOOL PRACTICES
Pre-requisite: None.
This course is designed to provide the student with basic operational skills and knowledge of some common machine tools associated with the field of gunsmithing. Use of the engine lathe, lathe accessories, tool bit grinding and lathe machining procedures will be emphasized in this course. Use of the bench and pedestal grinders and metal cutting saws will also be covered. The student will develop skills with these machine tools through the manufacture of gunsmithing tools. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 1213 BENCH METAL WORK
Pre-requisite: None.
This course is a study of the care and use of common bench tools as they apply to the field of gunsmithing. The use of the sensitive drill press, the basics of forging, heat treatment, nonfusion bonding techniques (i.e. brazing, silver soldering and soft soldering), semi-precision layout and the use of the oxyacetylene torch will also be covered. The student will develop skills with common hand tools and gunsmithing bench techniques through the construction of common gunsmithing tools. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 2553 INTRO TO CNC (Elective)
Pre-requisite: None.
This course is designed to provide students in the Gunsmithing Technology Program with a basic knowledge of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programming. An emphasis will be placed on programming in 3 axes on a milling machine as students learn to write simple part programs using conversational programming, importing programs and drawings to the mill, and learning basic “G” codes. Two lecture hours and two lab hours; (Elective) Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 1233 STOCKMAKING I
Pre-requisite: GS 1213 & GS 1613.
This course is an in-depth study of the design, fit, layout, and function of wood stocks. Students will learn to fit a stock to a shooter by the use of a “try-gun”, and then perform the proper layout and construction of an American classic stock. Students will work on semi-inletted stocks. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week; Credit: Three semester hours

GS 1324 MACHINE METAL WORK I
Pre-requisite: GS 1313.
This course is a continuation of GS 1313, Machine Tool Practices. It is designed to continue developing operational and procedural skills on the Engine lathe and to provide the student with basic operational skills of the Vertical Milling Machine and the Horizontal Spindle Surface Grinder. The student will develop skills with these machine tools through laboratory exercises and the manufacture of gunsmithing tools. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week; Credit: Four semester hours.

GS 1313 MACHINE METAL WORK II
Pre-requisite: GS 1313
This course is a continuation of GS 1313 and GS 1324. It is designed to continue developing operational and procedural skills on the engine lathe, vertical milling machine, and the Horizontal Spindle Surface Grinder. Use of the Electric Checkering tool will also be covered. Application of the use of these machine tools toward the manufacture of custom gun parts and custom modifications will be emphasized. The student will further develop and refine skills with these machine tools through the manufacture of custom gun parts and gunsmithing tools. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 2213 GENERAL METALS
Pre-requisite: GS 1313
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic working knowledge in the field of metallurgy as it applies to gunsmithing and metalsmithing techniques. Emphasis will be placed on characteristics and selection of various metal alloys, heat treating/tempering processes that apply to metal alloys, and hardness and tensile strength testing of various metal alloys. Students will also develop skills in the process of color case hardening, the manufacturing and tempering of gun springs, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS1201 GUN STORE MANAGEMENT
Pre-requisite: None
A study of the problems faced in creation and growth of a gunsmithing business such as, opportunity recognition, financing, money flow, business organization, shop location and layout, record keeping, stock and inventory, local, state, federal laws, and insurance. One lecture hour a week; Credit: One semester hour.

GS 2503 ADVANCED GUNSMITHING THEORY
Pre-requisite: GS 1113
This course is a study of advanced gunsmith practices, required in a professional gunsmithing career. Topics covered include: barrel relining, choke tubes, barrel dent removal, back boring of shotgun barrels, bolt action feed work, stuck cartridge removal, bolt face repair, quarter ribs and custom scope bases. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week; Credit: Three semester hours

GS 2573 METAL FINISHING
Pre-requisite: GS 1113 and GS 1012
This course is a study of various chemical processes and metal preparation techniques as applied to gun metal finishing. Metal finishing processes including Nitre bluing or coloring, electro less nickel plating, zinc and manganese phosphate coating (Parkerizing), and aluminum anodizing will be covered in this course, as will metal preparation utilizing power and hand techniques, equipment, and safety factors. Students will develop skills with by preparing and applying these various metal finishes to project firearms. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 2582 HANDLOADING AND BALLISTICS: (Elective)
Pre-requisite: GS 1122 Gunsmithing Theory II
This course is a study of the bullet’s flight from barrel to target; history and evolution of loading components; use of various types of powder, primers and cases; types of bullets and effect on rifling in barrel; actual loading and testing of ammunition; loading tools and dies; and safety factors. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 1613 RIFLESMITHING
Pre-requisite: GS 1213 & GS 1313.
This course is a detailed study in the construction and assembly of custom rifles. It will include the study of the design and function of common commercial and military turn bolt rifles and the AR-15 style upper receiver. The following Riflesmithing topics will be covered during this course: design and function of various receiver designs, restyling of military actions to a sporter configuration, Accurizing procedures, breeching systems, barrel contouring and fitting, headspacing and chambering of barrels, trigger design and installation, bolt modifications, safety modifications, sight calculation and installation, magazine and receiver modifications, trouble diagnosis, and gas port location. The student will develop skills in these topics by re-barreling a commercial or military turn bolt rifle action and assembling an AR-15 style upper receiver. All barrel work will be done from a barrel blank. Students will be required to do research paper and presentation on rifle design. This course will consist of two lecture hour and two laboratory hours per week (Three credit hours). The student will need to continue supervised laboratory work to complete this course.

GS 2133 REPAIRING OF FIREARMS I
Pre-requisite: GS 1113.
This course is a study of repairing of all types of rifles, pistols, and shotguns stressing factory methods and techniques, diagnosing malfunctions, fitting and adjusting parts. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Three semester hours.

GS 2142 REPAIRING OF FIREARMS II
Pre-requisite: GS 2133.
This is a continuation of GS 2133. Diagnosing malfunctions fitting and adjusting gun parts stressing factory methods and techniques for more complex repairs are studied. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours a week; Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 2633 PISTOLSMITHING: (New Class added)
Pre-requisite: GS 1122 Gunsmithing Theory II
This course is an in-depth study of the custom handgun. Primary focus will be on the construction of a custom 1911 pistol. Students will also learn about custom Colt/Ruger single action revolvers and the various S&W double action ppc revolvers. Topics covered include, building competition level pistols, fitting link and ramped barrels, throating, ranging, cylinder timing, fitting slides to frames, installing aftermarket accessories, as well as dealing with accuracy and recoil issues. Three Credit hours: Two lecture and two lab hours per week.

GS 2662 ACCURIZING FACTORY RIFLES: (Elective)
Pre-requisite: GS 1113 Gunsmithing Theory I.
In this course, the student will learn to modify a factory rifle to maximize its performance. This class will provide the knowledge necessary to develop the skills needed to convert a factory rifle into a precision instrument. This course will focus on the Remington, Savage and Winchester Model 70/FN SPR actions, but will also be open to other pre-approved actions as well. This class will provide instruction in blue printing actions and precision barrel chambering practices will be covered extensively, along with bedding the completed barreled action. This class also covers practical accessories, proper scope selection and mounting optics. One lecture hour and two lab hours; (Elective) Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 1362 MACHINE SHOP l: (Elective)
Pre-requisite: GS 1122 Gunsmithing Theory II
This course is designed to give practical machine tool experience and guidance to gunsmithing students. It allows students to use the machining skills they have developed to solve everyday problems that they will face as professional gunsmiths. Advanced students may further develop skills and speed through practical use of various machine tools and machining processes. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours a week; (Elective) Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 2642 STOCKMAKING II: (Elective)
Pre-requisite: GS 2623 Stockmaking I
This course is a continuation of GS 2623. It is designed to continue the construction of the American Classic Gunstock. Topics covered will include: forend tips, grip caps, butt plates, sling swivels, sanding, finishing, and checkering. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours a week; (Elective) Credit: Two semester hours.

GS 2542 ADVANCED AUTOCAD: (Elective)
Pre-requisite: GS 1512 Blueprint reading
This course is a continuation of GS 1512 Blueprint Reading. In this course students will build upon their knowledge of AutoCAD by using more advanced methods of drawing, and utilizing the different input methods to increase their speed. In this course the student will become familiar with 3D drawing in AutoCAD and learn how to model parts in both 2D and 3D before projecting them into a 3 view standard format. Primary focus of this class is the introduction and utilization of 3D modeling, as well as using the different drawing formats available in order to maintain compatibility between the various modeling software available, such as Solidworks, and Catia. Projects will be assigned, but the majority of the drawings will be of the students’ choice. Two credit hours: One lecture and two lab hours per week.
 
GS 2592 ADVANCED METAL FINISHING: (Elective) (New Class Added)
Pre-requisite: GS 1012 Gunbluing & GS 2023 Metal Finishing
This course is a continued study in metal preparation techniques and the chemical processes as they relate to metal finishing of firearms. Processes that were introduced in GS 1012: Gun Bluing and GS 2023: Metal Finishing will be expanded to more complex levels. These processes may include various bluing techniques, Parkerizing; spay finishes, aluminum anodizing, Electroless nickel plating, and hydrographic. Additional processes including Nickel Boron Plating and Electro-brush plating will be covered. The student will continue to develop and refine skills with these processes by the application to firearm projects. This course will consist of one lecture hour and two laboratory hours per week. Addition supervised laboratory hours will be required to complete this course.
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